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Indicators for Wound Care Treatment

Every wound has a unique set of circumstances. The Crittenton Wound Healing Center is equipped and staffed with an experienced team to address them. We are experts at wound care for people whose open sores have resisted traditional treatment. Find here several indicators and conditions that can be addressed by the Wound Healing Center at Crittenton Hospital where your care matters most.

Peripheral Arterial Disease

Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is caused by the obstruction of large arteries in the arms and legs. PAD occurs when plaque builds up in the arteries, eventually narrowing the arteries and limiting the flow of oxygenated blood to other parts of your body. PAD usually affects the legs, causing pain and numbness. It also puts you at risk for infection, and left untreated can cause gangrene.

Diabetic Wound Care

A diabetic foot ulcer is an open sore or wound that most commonly occurs on the bottom of the foot in approximately 1 in 10 people with diabetes. Anyone who has diabetes can develop a foot ulcer. Older men are more likely to develop ulcers. People who use insulin are at a higher risk of developing a foot ulcer, as are patients with diabetes-related kidney, eye, and heart disease. Being overweight and using alcohol and tobacco also play a role in the development of foot ulcers. Ulcers form due to a combination of factors, such as neuropathy, poor circulation, foot deformities, irritation (such as friction or pressure), and trauma, as well as duration of diabetes. Neuropathy is a reduced or complete lack of feeling in the feet due to nerve damage caused by elevated blood glucose levels over time. The nerve damage often can occur without pain and one may not even be aware of the problem.

Edema

Edema is swelling caused by excess fluid trapped in your body’s tissues. Although edema affects various parts of the body, it is common to be in legs, feet and ankles. Identifying and treating the cause is key to controlling it.

Ischemia

Ischemia is an inadequate flow of blood to a part of the body caused by a blockage of the blood vessels. This blockage results in tissue damage due to lack of adequate oxygen and nutrients.

Malignant Tumor

A Malignant tumor is cancerous growth that can invade and destroy nearby tissue, and may spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body.

Osteomyelitis

Osteomyelitis is a bone infection. It can occur in any bone in the body, but it usually affects the long bones (leg and arm), vertebral, and foot bones. Infections can reach a bone by traveling through your bloodstream or spreading from nearby tissue. Infections can also begin in the bone itself if trauma exposes your bone to germs.

Radiation Destruction

Radiation injury to tissues or bone (radionecrosis, radiation necrosis, osteoradionecrosis) is, sometimes, a complication of radiation therapy for a tumor. This occurs because the radiation can damage normal cells while attempting to irradiate tumor cells. Destruction of bone and/or tissue of the irradiated area can result in local poor or non-healing wounds, destruction of bone, and bleeding. Radiation therapy for pelvic or abdominal tumors may result in bleeding or other symptoms. Bleeding from the bladder (radiation cystitis), or rectum (radiation proctitis) are the most common complications. Radiation treatments for head and neck cancer can cause long term damage to the jaw and/or teeth (osteoradionecrosis). Radiation of the chest for breast or lung cancer may result in soft tissue radionecrosis of the chest wall with symptoms of reduced range of motion or swelling of the lymph nodes.

Soft Tissue Infection

Radiation injury to tissues or bone (radionecrosis, radiation necrosis, osteoradionecrosis) is, sometimes, a complication of radiation therapy for a tumor. This occurs because the radiation can damage normal cells while attempting to irradiate tumor cells. Destruction of bone and/or tissue of the irradiated area can result in local poor or non-healing wounds, destruction of bone, and bleeding. Radiation therapy for pelvic or abdominal tumors may result in bleeding or other symptoms. Bleeding from the bladder (radiation cystitis), or rectum (radiation proctitis) are the most common complications. Radiation treatments for head and neck cancer can cause long term damage to the jaw and/or teeth (osteoradionecrosis). Radiation of the chest for breast or lung cancer may result in soft tissue radionecrosis of the chest wall with symptoms of reduced range of motion or swelling of the lymph nodes.

Venous Disease

Veins in the legs have one-way valves that allow blood to flow from the legs toward the body and eventually, to the heart. When veins become blocked or when the valves don’t work properly, blood will pool in the leg. Pooling of blood in the leg can cause swelling and pain, particularly when standing. These are the first symptoms that occur with chronic venous disease (also known as chronic venous insufficiency). Also the high pressures in the veins can cause blood to leak out of the vessels and into the tissues. The blood becomes trapped in the skin, and turns brown. This brownish pigmentation typically occurs around and above the ankles. Over time, the leakage of blood and fluid into the leg can cause damage to the skin and ulcers of the skin can occur, usually in the ankle area.